1. Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T2i
  2. Aperture: f/1.8
  3. Exposure: 1/250th
  4. Focal Length: 76mm

theatlantic:

Can a Twitter Bot Capture Chicago’s Essence?

When established in 1833, the Town of Chicago incorporated fewer than 200 people into its new borders. Within seven years—the city’s first decennial U.S. census—more than 4,000 people lived there; after another 10 almost 30,000 people did.

The city kept growing, both in size and population. In 1880, half a million people lived within its borders. In 1890, that number had doubled. At the turn of the century, 1.6 million people called themselves Chicagoans, and the city was the fifth largest in the world.

Something happened on the land we call Chicago that had happened nowhere else before. In the span of a lifetime, the city went from nascence to dominance—and since then, people have been trying to figure out what that new place is and what it can be.

A new Twitter account does the job rather stirringly. Created by Luke Seeman, a designer and developer at Chicago magazine, @whatschicago retweets tweets that begin with the phrase “Chicago is.”

Read more. [Image: Bryce Edwards / Flickr]

  1. Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T2i
  2. Aperture: f/1.8
  3. Exposure: 1/250th
  4. Focal Length: 76mm

Take 300,000 computer-controlled mirrors, each 7 feet high and 10 feet wide. Control them with computers to focus the Sun’s light to the top of 459-foot towers, where water is turned into steam to power turbines. Bingo: you have the world’s biggest solar power plant, the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System.

pennyfornasa:

NASA’s Technology Transfer Program, which helps opens up NASA’s research and technology to the public for use and development, is being utilized to help develop novel biotechnology approaches that could have multiple applications in space and on Earth.


The agency’s two patent license agreements with GRoK Technologies LLC of Houston grant rights for four patented NASA/GRoK technologies to be reviewed for their potential to regenerating bone and muscle.
It is well-known that astronauts are susceptible to developing osteopenia, a condition arising from the loss of bone and muscle mass and bone density, during long spaceflights. GRoK has the opportunity to develop breakthrough products for the research and medical communities, which could advance our overall understanding of biomedicine.
The company will be able to use these patented methods on two in-development platform technologies:

BioReplicates, which will allow users to create 3-D human tissue models that can be used to test cosmetics, drugs and other products for safety, efficacy and toxicity with greater accuracy, reliability and cost-efficiency.
Scionic, which could lead to the development of medical devices designed to target musculoskeletal pain and inflammation in humans and animals noninvasively and without the use of pharmaceuticals.

Moshe Kushman, GRoK’s founder and CEO, enthusiastically said “It’s not just science fiction anymore. All indications are that 21st century life sciences will change dramatically during the next several decades, and GRoK is working to define the forefront of a new scientific wave.”

Take action. Tell Congress that you support doubling funding for NASA so that they can continue to contribute to the advancement of medical technology. http://penny4nasa.org/take-action

Read more: http://www.space-travel.com/reports/NASA_Technology_to_Help_Develop_Noninvasive_Medical_Treatments_999.html

theatlantic:

Can a Twitter Bot Capture Chicago’s Essence?

When established in 1833, the Town of Chicago incorporated fewer than 200 people into its new borders. Within seven years—the city’s first decennial U.S. census—more than 4,000 people lived there; after another 10 almost 30,000 people did.

The city kept growing, both in size and population. In 1880, half a million people lived within its borders. In 1890, that number had doubled. At the turn of the century, 1.6 million people called themselves Chicagoans, and the city was the fifth largest in the world.

Something happened on the land we call Chicago that had happened nowhere else before. In the span of a lifetime, the city went from nascence to dominance—and since then, people have been trying to figure out what that new place is and what it can be.

A new Twitter account does the job rather stirringly. Created by Luke Seeman, a designer and developer at Chicago magazine, @whatschicago retweets tweets that begin with the phrase “Chicago is.”

Read more. [Image: Bryce Edwards / Flickr]

dorkly:

This GoPro Camera Had a Real Bad Day.

Dropped from an airplane, devoured by animals. It’s eerily similar to that dark reboot of “The Brave Little Toaster” I’ve been shopping around Hollywood.